Interview: High and Mighty Low

This interview was originally published in Mixtape Methodology. In it, I explore the emotional significance of cover songs, on a musical journey with LA alt-rockers High and Mighty Low. Read to find out why The Beatles’ “Blackbird” still rocks.

A Brief Examination of High and Mighty Low’s Blackbird

hml3What’s your jam? Maybe you heard your latest fave last night at the club. Or is your best-loved song an old favorite? Many music fans create playlists or vinyl collections featuring songs marking a significant time, or a rite of passage. The beginning of a relationship. Or its end. A song played on repeat in the privacy of headphones or on your morning commute is, for that moment, yours alone. What you listen to forms a lens calibrating your worldview. When one powerful song becomes “my jam,” it’s the manifestation of your own anthem.

Singer-songwriter Marissa Nadler says “Fake Plastic Trees,” a song from Radiohead’s The Bends, marked a musically significant point in her life. “The Bends came out in 1995, and I was 14 and just starting to learn the guitar.” Nadler wanted to sing “Fake Plastic Trees.” “It was the first time I really successfully played barre chords,” she said. “The Bends, along with [Nirvana’s] In Utero, and even [Hole’s] Live Through This, these were albums that soundtracked the teenage years for me.”

It’s kind of freakish to think about the ingredients that go into an original song…Read the rest of the interview here.

 

 

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